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Uchiko

Andy said that to him, there was very few compelling arguments for being wealthy. But he said, this food is one of them.

It's true. So delicious.  I told him that maybe this could be my incentive for being a corporate worker. For every week, I get to go to Uchiko.

So, the spreadsheet with all my expenses? Having it all broken down have been so good for me. Guess what my major purchase is so far? Food. Yes, obviously. A lot more then my clothing, and almost as much as my mortgage. I'm eating my house each month!

Andy told me sternly: "You're going to keep the October fast right?" Yes, it's still on the plan. I guess all the $200 will go towards food. bobacita  is visiting Austin in a few weeks and wants to go to foreign and domestic, so I'll portion some for that.

Anyways, Uchiko was amazing last night. The service was impeccable. I've only been there once, but I was recognized by the host, the waitress and the server. It must be my sparkling personality ;-) J/k.  Austin Restaurant Week started yesterday. Yay!




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dnivie
Sep. 20th, 2010 04:51 pm (UTC)
Freedom
Since we've all pretty much got our basic needs covered, there's really only one compelling arguments for being wealthy. Good food is an example, but I think that's just a specific example where the general advantage is -choice-.

Pretty much everyone in the west, gets to eat. And pretty much everyone can even afford to eat enough, and to eat healthy. However, if you have more money, you can choose *which* food to eat. You can choose to spend $100 in a excellent restaurant.

If I ain't got money, and the bills are piling up, I don't have much choice than to accept whatever work I can get. If I am financially independent, work itself is optional. (If I'm somewhere in between, I do need work, but can afford to be more picky)

To me, it feels as if personal freedom today is -very- strongly connected to wealth. If you have $100M in the bank, you can (pretty much) do whatever you want for life. If you've got $137, and it's a week until your next paycheck, your freedom is, in practice, pretty limited.

Yes, I know, in speeches, the best things in life are free. But even for those things, money frees you up to pursue them. Having a wonderful partner may be 'free' in the financial sense. But being able to refuse overtime to spend time with her instead, sure isn't.
ripresa
Sep. 20th, 2010 07:13 pm (UTC)
Re: Freedom
Yes, definitely, financial independence is what I'm after. Andy doesn't really care about it.

I also don't mind doing part-time jobs in artistic/creative fields as part of my "financial independence".
dnivie
Sep. 23rd, 2010 01:38 pm (UTC)
Re: Freedom
It's a more-less kind of thing not a yes-no kind of thing anyway. Atleast for most.

Can we afford to take a extra week of unpaid vacationtime ? Can we afford to work only 80% ? Can we afford to eat for $250 today (knowing full well we could feed the family adequately for a fraction of that)

I don't think we'll be fully independent long before we retire, with luck we may be from age 55 or so, but even that is uncertain.

What I do think, is that our wiggle-room will expand, leave us space to make *more* comfortable choices. Forcing us to say "no" more seldom, and "let's do it" more often.